Where’s My Fish? Revisited Part 3

This article series has gone from finding out how to keep these fish around to figuring out why they won’t despawn. Honestly, I’m ok with this. Haha. Best case scenario, the problem has fixed itself as a side effect to a patch note or update. I’m simply enjoying having something to continue writing about. Today’s test is going to involve the daylight cycle in Minecraft. The question being “Does the daylight cycle have anything to do with despawning fish?”

The daylight cycle in Minecraft references the amount of time that day and night lasts in this game. A single daylight cycle is roughly 20 minutes long. In that time frame, dozens of mobs spawn in your general area, animals appear and disappear from sight, etc.

The test is going to remain the same. Going from marker to marker every 25 minutes. Checking in on the three different types of fish to see if they stick around or not. There are 4 tanks per type of fish to include the different methods of putting them in a tank. If you want more details, head over to part 1 for a quick rundown of those methods. If you’re all caught up. let’s take a look at how these fish handle the daylight cycle.

While every named fish has managed to get themselves stuck behind the anvil in their respective tanks, everyone made it through night 1 of this test. Jerry, Tim, and Dorry might remain stuck behind anvils for the rest of the test, but at least I know where to look. As I’m going through this process again, I can’t help but try to think of the other variables that I could be testing out soon. Variables like biome, fish per block of water, whether or not the player is looking at the tanks, and more.

The second round comes to a close and everyone is still swimming around in their respective tanks. At this point, we’ve reached the 60-block mark. I’m honestly thinking that the next addition in this series will be about simulation chunks and playing with that as a variable. I typically play with the game set to 8 chunks, but I know that plenty of people play at the default of 4 chunks.

All of the fish are still around and ready to jam into the last mark. While I’m waiting these next 25 minutes, I’d like to know what you guys think could be the cause of despawning fish. There could be a single cause, or a combination of different things going on in someone's game. I typically spend this time going over what I should try next, but I'm eager to hear what you guys' think.

After my last alarm went off, I was not surprised to see all of the fish still doing circles in their tanks. This doesn’t include the named fish who were still swimming in place as if they were trying to move their anvil with their little faces. With that being said, I think that next time we’ll be taking a look at chunk distance or doing all of what has been done so far on a flat world. Thank you for reading.

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